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  • An ingredient for success

       

    An ingredient for success Sally Walker triple washes Glade Road Growing's spinach in well water tested for cleanliness and then stores the washed leaves in plastic bins. Both tasks are examples of food safety procedures.

    Greenhouse fans whir at Mike Calhoun’s hydroponic lettuce-growing operation while workers harvest the four varieties grown at Stover Shop Greenhouses in Churchville, Virginia.

    Calhoun’s farming operation is certified by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) program, an initiative that requires an internal audit of bookkeeping, growing, and production operations. Once growers pass the audit, they can apply for a GAP logo to display on packaging.

  • Virginia Master Gardeners gather at Virginia Tech to learn and network

       

    A master gardener makes a floral arrangement Classes offered at the Master Gardener College cover a wide range of topics from greenhouse propagation of bog plants to floral arrangements.

    Nearly 250 Master Gardeners from across Virginia will attend the 27th annual Master Gardener College at Virginia Tech June 25-29. 

    The conference, hosted by Virginia Cooperative Extension, offers continuing education for its more than 5,500 Master Gardener volunteers.

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  • 4-H'ers honor the history of 4-H while working toward a better future at the 2014 State Congress

       

    4-H'ers honor the history of 4-H while working toward a better future at the 2014 State Congress 4-H'ers gather at the Virginia Tech War Memorial Chapel Pylons during a previous 4-H State Congress.

    More than 500 teens, volunteer leaders, and Virginia Cooperative Extension agents will gather on Virginia Tech’s Blacksburg campus June 16-19 for the 94th annual 4-H State Congress.

    This year’s theme, “Celebrating the Past, Making It Last,” draws on the history of 4-H and demonstrates the power of 4-H to assist teens in developing leadership, citizenship, and life skills through hands-on educational programs.

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  • Working to stop stink bugs in their tracks

       

    Working to stop stink bugs in their tracks Ames Herbert, Extension entomologist, scouts for stink bugs in a soybean field in Tidewater, Va.

    In the 13 years since the brown marmorated stink bug was discovered in Pennsylvania, the voracious insect has made a slow and steady march toward Virginia. It was found in the commonwealth in 2004, and it has caused millions of dollars in damage as it destroyed apples and grapes in the Shenandoah Valley, pierced soybeans in north-central fields, and sucked the proteins and carbohydrates out of corn, tomato, green bean, and pepper plants in other parts of the state.

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  • Virginia Cooperative Extension Reaches 2.6 Million People Annually

       

    Virginia Cooperative Extension Reaches 2.6 Million People Annually 4-H participants in Alexandria, Va., learn about GIS mapping technology as part of the 4-H National Youth Science Day. Photo courtesy of the National 4-H Council.

    Since the 1914 Smith-Lever Act established the national Cooperative Extension System, Virginia Cooperative Extension has delivered the knowledge and resources of the state’s two land-grant universities — Virginia Tech and Virginia State University — to the people.

    Society and its issues have changed during the past 100 years, but Extension’s mission has never wavered.

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